Peer Review #3

Hi Christella,

I just read your wonderful creative entry found here and I was moved by the meaningfulness of your prose.
I think we can all relate to the grief associated with losing a loved one but I appreciated that you also acknowledged  the clarity that comes from realising that the soul is seperate from the body and it in fact lives on long after death.
This cleverly emulated the whole idea of the visionary imagination and I related it to a lot of my own creative work.
Your technique was sound throughout and you included imagery and dialogue to mould your poem however there were instances where I felt that perhaps you could have been more inventive with your wording (sometimes a cheeky thesaurus right click on Word makes the World of difference). This is only a minor critique though so please don’t be disheartened as I overall I did feel as though you captured loss in a very unique way.
I also loved that the photograph you provided was your own work- it is gorgeous. Perhaps we can connect and you can show me your photography portfolio 🙂

Great work!

Taylor-Rose

Summative Entry

My exposure to the concept of “the visionary imagination” through the (visionary) work of William Blake, Brett Whiteley and Patrick White has both literally and metaphorically opened my eyes to the innately spiritual nature of humanity that exists well outside of organised religion. As someone who was relatively conservative and held more traditional views about faith and life, I found that I was challenged both intellectually and morally to move beyond my conventional views and now the guise of the world will forever be different for me going forward…

Over the course of the Semester I have engaged with the thought-provoking work of the aforementioned men through their literature, art and even song and each moment of exposure was illustrated with pivotal growth and in turn understanding about the beliefs that propelled these men to write so vivaciously and articulately about life. By way of writing my blogs I was able to further develop my own learning and appreciation of the works of these men. I was compelled to indulge in my creative side and was drawn to the topics that allowed me to express imagination in innovative ways which I have truly enjoyed.

Diving deep into the world of William Blake encapsulated my spirit and dared my mind into complexities I would not have otherwise had the vigour to pursue. His journey from being a rational and moralistic religious man to an artist who holds sacred the ecstatic and emotional experience of being spiritually discerned; pervaded his work. Blake’s art is characterised by the idea that what is ‘Divine’ is evoked through imagination and joyous appreciation of the body; in harmony with that which is inspired by creativity. As such, this stirred my own enlightenment, much like that of Alan Ginsberg and I captured this in my best blog.

Continuing on with William Blake’s view of the visionary imagination and seeing beyond the material substantiated world, Brett Whiteley’s Alchemy is the clever amalgamation of opposites that create profound understanding of spirituality. Through his artwork, Whiteley fortified the concept of seeing beyond what does not exist, an almost spiritually heightened version of ‘reading between the lines’ propelled by the visual imagination. Whiteley cleverly captures this enlightenment with the flecks of gold that permeate the landscape in his paintings. There is Hell in Paradise, the Good of man is pitted against what is traditionally ‘evil’ and his interest in a ‘schizophrenic state of mind’ is expressed in Alchemy offering a profound challenge to my own somewhat conformist views. The full extent of my understanding is captured here!

Patrick White’s memorable portrait of inner beauty when explaining even the most ordinary individual has been riveting to say the least. He is an artist and a man who has an enchanted ability to transform the more humdrum aspects of life and of people into the absolute indescribable. The way he expresses his own ‘prophetic ambition’ to ‘re-sacralise’ the spiritually desolate Australian social landscape set in stone that he is an artist after my own heart and I feel as though I have been on a truly magical journey throughout this unit. My blog “To the world you are one person, but to one person you are the world” truly captures this.

My own enlightenment has served as a testament to the powerful nature of the Visionary Imagination and how the work of William Blake, Brett Whiteley and Patrick White has nurtured a kind of spiritual growth that I never knew I needed. It takes only one person to change the world and I fully intend on cultivating the knowledge that I have attained throughout this course to propel this liberal way of life to all of those I come across.

Taylor-Rose x

Once I saw a devil in a flame…

In your own words, using your own imagination, continue a story that begins: “Once I saw a Devil in a flame….

Once I saw a Devil in a flame and he was haunted by glowing orange and yellow embers. The flickering fire ferociously spat broken visions of sinister grins and sad, wide eyes while his body came in short hot bursts with a pitchfork in tow.
Once I saw a Devil in a flame and it filled my nights with terrible terrors that tore through my body from toe to top. The sweat pierced through my pores drenching my skin in a sea of salty warm liquid that hid the secrets of a thousand stories and a vivid monster lurking at every door.

Once I saw a Devil in a flame and I was blinded by the fire of one thousand suns. As I shielded my eyes from the red hot heat I noticed that the warmth slowly began to fade. Confused. Uneasy. I peeked over my palm half expecting to meet the glare of my Demon when in reality I was only staring back at my own relfection…

To the world you are one person, but to one person you are the world.

Using something of Patrick White’s style of writing describe a totally ordinary person in such a way that you reveal their inner humanity, totally different from what their exterior appearance might suggest.

To the world you are one person, but to one person you are the world. Tough walls have been erected around the pillars of your gentle face and the sternness of your features warn away the world. The harsh, grey stone wall etched around your heart deflects the damage that you have been dragged through but beneath the lines you are supple and golden. Your purity from within envelops the entirety of your spirit and your goodness glows gloriously around the way you accept those around you. There is light in your touch, there is warmth in your fingertips and the joy in your hands spreads so effortlessly in each transient interaction.
Do you see that glistening in the reflection? That sweet sparkle in your eye? There is hope in that shimmer so promise me that you will never let it dwindle…

Peer Review 2 Vis. Imagination

https://claireacourtsblog.wordpress.com/2019/08/28/ah-sun-flower-william-blake/#respond

 

Hi Clare!

I think you captured the essence of not only this poem but William Blake’s vision as a writer and artist. Your discussion of the journey of the travellers in this poem and how it personifies the journey of life, the trials and tribulations of human existence and how the ordinary man can live a meaningful life eminates throughout most of Blake’s work.
I agree with you when you say that the travellers are seeking a more distinct purpose (from life) and that you feel this transitions into the after life would sate their desires.
You summarised the idea of ‘Ah, sunflower’ as human existence being brutal unless of coarse the divine connection that is an innate part of our survival is found and again I totally agree with your conclusion.

You recognised that Blake is almost desperate for us to realise this and raise ourselves out of the figurative holes that our forefathers have thrown us in- pursuing a better life either in this realm or the next.

I have come to very similar conclusions about the work of William Blake and as such found your discussion insightful and interesting! You have a great understanding of the concepts of this unit!

 

Well done 😀

NSW Art Gallery- Prints and Drawing Room/ Brett Whiteley Studio

Walking into the Drawing Room of the NSW Art Gallery seeing the crisp, clean shelving where Blake’s Job series was set was an incredible experience. The Book of Job series embodied the sentiment of ‘cleansing the doors of perception’ through a dramatized journey that has the Old and New testament nuancing throughout it. The drawing room that beset some of the most intricate, complex and detailed work that I have ever seen in the flesh was incomparable to anything I have ever been lucky enough to do in my degree so far. Being no more than a long breath away from a pen that was once connected to William Blake’s own fingertips and witnessing the intricacy of his genius, the bleeding of the colours marred by the holy fallacies and the chilling words of the holy book created a spiritual experience.

The Book of Job inspired my understanding of Blake’s hopes to move religion away from theological formulations and moralistic judgmentalism to an open-hearted acceptance of the immense mystery and wonder of creation and towards the inner experience of the sacred.

Travelling through Whiteley’s transformative imagination, I experienced the chaotic journey that matched the mayhem within his painting. Overwhelmed. Confused. In awe. Those are the three words that come to me when I reflect on the masterpiece that is Alchemy. The deliberate use of colour and imagery are symbolic of the roots of alchemy and his purposeful identification of the world that is beyond. An extension of life, if you will, that has deepened my reality. The whirls of blue’s and green’s emulate an innocence that we all possess in our early stages of life however their deterioration into harsher red’s and black showcase the destruction of this innocence as we become more exposed to life’s adversities. The flecks of gold create warmth and purity however I am convinced the colours are intended to juxtapose one another and the erratic nature of the painting is intentional.
What an awe-inspiring encounter that was!

Peer Review 1 Vis. Imagination

https://temperantwolves.wordpress.com/2019/08/30/engl-329-blog-2/

Wow Mitchell I thoroughly enjoyed this post! I chose to read this passage of yours to analyse our creative differences. You did not disappoint! I appreciated that you gave the ‘Devil’ a voice as you made the character quite sinister and I would be lying if I said I was not frightened. The line “the dread that swallowed my heart” was so eery and effective, It really delivered the overall tone that I feel you were trying to achieve.

All over it was such great read! Well done 😀

Once I saw a Devil in a flame…

In your own words, using your own imagination, continue a story that begins: “Once I saw a Devil in a flame….

Once I saw a Devil in a flame and he was haunted by glowing orange and yellow embers. The flickering fire ferociously spat broken visions of sinister grins and sad, wide eyes while his body came in short hot bursts with a pitchfork in tow.
Once I saw a Devil in a flame and it filled my nights with terrible terrors that tore through my body from toe to top. The sweat pierced through my pores drenching my skin in a sea of salty warm liquid that hid the secrets of a thousand stories and a vivid monster lurking at every door.

Once I saw a Devil in a flame and I was blinded by the fire of one thousand suns. As I shielded my eyes from the red hot heat I noticed that the warmth slowly began to fade. Confused. Uneasy. I peeked over my palm half expecting to meet the glare of my Demon when in reality I was only staring back at my own relfection…

The Doors (Of Perception)

Find out about The Doors what kind of impact did their Blakean music have on the era in which they wrote.

“If the doors of perception were cleansed everything would appear to man as it is, Infinite.” William Blake

This line from William Blakes ‘Marriage of Heaven and Hell’ bore the name of everybody’s favourite psychedelic sixties band- The Doors. But just how much of Blake did Jim Morrison know about? Blake makes an appearance in Morrisons ‘End of Night’ on the Doors debut album but upon closer inspection it becomes apparent that Morrison did more than only a little vague and random dipping into Blake.
Ray Manzarek was right to think of Morrison as an authority on the visionary poet that was William Blake as in Rocco’s “Doors Companion’ Manzarek was recorded saying “I wonder what Blake said… Too bad Morrison‘s not here. Morrison would know.”

Blake seems to come readily to Morrison’s lips as he hinted his acquaintance with famous lines from Songs of Innocence and Songs of Experience. Whether it is his ‘apocalyptic vision’ or ‘erotic mysticism’ Morrison allows Blakes belief that the “body was the soul’s prison- unless the five senses are fully developed and open” to influence his own artistic flare. William Blake understood the senses as “windows of the soul” and Jim Morrison allowed this to in turn permeate to his own. This is especially relative to the Era in which The Doors found their fame and wrote anthem after anthem for the LSD era of the 1960’s.

Little Lamb..

Use the first line of any of Blake’s poems and write your own poem, based on your own experience of the issues that Blake seems to be addressing.

Little Lamb who made thee
a delightful wonder sent from above
Thou should know the value of
The miracles that flow n’ flow n’ flow
Like the spiritual waters, cleansing the soul

From the very tip of the Mountain top
A collection of sparkling rain drops
Form a life giving blessing where
Mother earth can soak up
What her soul has chose to bare

The lips of life have touched thee
And soon enough the Little Lamb will see
The intrinsic nature of our life
Touches each and every spirit in site